Fake Stonehenge – Washington State WWI monument

Sometime before 1918, Sam Hill, a Pacific Northwest businessman,  visited Stonehenge in England and was so moved by what he erroneously thought was an ancient site used for human sacrifice, that he decided to replicate it as a monument to soldiers  who died in World War 1. He felt that it would be a reminder to our culture that we haven’t changed much – that we are still sacrificing people to the “god of war.”

It kind of feels like a stretch to me, even if it is true that this was the original purpose of the original Stonehenge, but to each his own.  I have never been to the original site, and I don’t doubt being there would be equally as mind-blowing for me as well. Who am I to judge.

I kept seeing photos of this on Instagram or Flickr from my friends when I lived in Spokane and I was very curious about it. I finally stopped here a couple of years ago on my way back to Portland while visiting my family in Spokane. It is just as weird as I imagined (oops, I’m judging.)

This monument is located in South Eastern Washington on the Columbia River, in the desert, off the beaten path. It’s just a really weird thing to see in the middle of the desert. So random and odd.

When I took these photos a British woman was visiting and she was completely appalled. I don’t blame her because I kind of don’t understand either. I like the intention behind it, though. And, honestly, you’ve got to give the guy credit for all of the work and money that was spent in creating this structure.

The altar stone is placed to align with sunrise on Summer Solstice,  and it just so happens that summer solstice is tomorrow! Look at me with my good timing!

Click on an image to open the gallery. The color were shot with a TerraPin Bijou and Lomo Purple, and the black and white shots are Zero 2000 and Acros 100. Exposure time for each way less than 5 seconds.

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11 thoughts on “Fake Stonehenge – Washington State WWI monument

    1. Thanks! I am loving that Lomo Purple the more I use it. It worked well at this place, I think! I hadn’t know about this place until a few years ago either, and I grew up in Eastern WA. It’s one of those hidden treasures! 🙂

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